UniChef.com

 

        The Professional Chef Site

 

         

 

HOME

 
 

RECIPES

 
 

GUEST CHEF

 
 

MISE EN PLACE

 
 

TOOLS

 
 

NEWS

 
 

SHOPPING

 
  TEAM USA  
  GLOSSARY  
  BOOKS  
  FOOD SAFETY  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cryptosporidium Found in Oysters from Chesapeake Bay

August 30, 1999

Cryptosporidium, a parasite that causes diarrhea, can be added to the list of reasons not to eat raw oysters, according to an article in an upcoming issue of the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.

Oysters feed by filtering water through their gills. When water is contaminated by run-off from pastures or sewage, oysters can keep the parasite in their gills and spread illness. Researchers tested oysters from seven sites used for commercial harvesting in the Chesapeake Bay area. Oysters from all the sites contained Cryptosporidium species both from cows and people. This finding shows that the water at these sites contained human and animal feces during a period when the oysters were filtering. The risk of contamination is probably higher after a heavy rain, but some risk is present year-round.

Infection with Cryptosporidiumm can cause prolonged diarrhea. The infection is especially dangerous for persons with weakened immune systems. However, heating to temperatures above 162 F kills the parasite, so the authors urge that oysters be cooked before they're eaten.

Access the full article at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol5no5/fayer.htm.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Monday, March 6, 2000
Contact: CDC, Division of Media Relations
(404) 6393286


© 2000-2005  mjbEnterprises
All rights reserved.
This document is strictly for informational purposes

Contact Advertising Terms Privacy